New Manitou telehandlers lifts rural presence

Presented by

Manitou MLT 840 telehandler Manitou MLT 840 telehandler Manitou MLT 840 telehandler
Manitou MLT 840 telehandler Manitou MLT 840 telehandler Manitou MLT 840 telehandler

The Manitou MLT 840 is a significant machine for Manitou, being the first of a new generation of telehandlers targeting the agricultural sector and the first to use a John Deere engine

New Manitou telehandlers lifts rural presence
Manitou MLT 840 telehandler

Takura Bark and Compost (Takura) has recently purchased its third Manitou telescopic handler, one of the first MLT 840 machines in the country.

When Carl and Paul Power and Roy Saunders bought the Hervey Bay business nine years ago, a Manitou telescopic handler came with it. When they came to replace this, they evaluated a number of brands before deciding on a Manitou MLT 735, and when that machine recently came due replacement, the MLT 840 came up trumps.

Carl Power, who operates the machine, regards Manitou as the benchmark in telescopic handlers and has noticed significant advances in the new machine.

The MLT 840 is a significant machine for Manitou, being the first of a new generation of machines targeting the agricultural sector and the first to use a John Deere engine.

The move to John Deere coincided with the move to Euro 3B engines. The John Deere engine brings with it a boost in performance, 137hp and 180 litres per minute hydraulic flow for the MLT 840-137 PS.

Power has noticed a big improvement in the power and hydraulic performance of the MLT 840, but he regards this machine as noticeably better in virtually all areas compared to its predecessor.

In basic specification it has slightly more reach and capacity than the machine it replaces.

From an operator's point of view, the cab is larger and the higher operator position provides Power with improved all-round vision.

The ergonomics of the Manitou joystick has always been well regarded, but in the MLT 840 the joystick is mounted on the armrest, providing greater operator control when moving over rough ground.

The Takura machine works with pallet forks, a 4-cubic-metre bulk bucket and a 2.5-cubic-metre standard bucket.

The business produces potting mix, garden mulch and engineered soft fall material for placement under playground equipment. This is distributed between Brisbane and Cairns, and Takura has its own 40-cubic-metre semi-trailer.

One of the main tasks of the Manitou is loading bark into a hammermill for sizing to suit the various products. However, it is also used for loading trucks and general loading and unloading with pallet forks. The business also has a wheel loader for bulk work.

Telehandlers average around 30 hours per week in the Takura business, and Power aims to change them over at around the 4,000-hour mark.

The machines do not operate on the road, so only three of the five gears are used regularly. Power prefers to use the transmission in manual rather than automatic mode, for greater responsiveness.

Nathan Gleeson from NTP Forklifts handled the sale, and Power was pleased with the changeover price from the MLT 735 that he traded. While previous machines were maintained locally once they were out of warranty, he is considering using NTP Forklifts for all servicing of the MLT 840.

Power is more than pleased with the performance to date of the MLT 840, and convinced that the changes keep Manitou at the head of the pack in the telescopic handler market.

You can also follow our updates by liking us on Facebook