Claas Shredlage technology arrives in Oz

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German agricultural brand Claas is introducing the new Shredlage silage processing technique from the Unites States which it claims to improve silage digestibility and livestock performance.

Claas Shredlage technology arrives in Oz
The Shredlage allows Claas Jaguar forage harvesters equipped with a specially designed roller-cracker unit to produce high quality, long-cut shredded corn silage.

The technology allows Claas Jaguar forage harvesters equipped with a specially designed roller-cracker unit to produce high quality, long-cut shredded corn silage.

Under an agreement with Shredlage Limited, Class aims to market the technology globally.

Claas Harvest Centre Greenline group product manager Luke Wheeler says the new technology will provide significant opportunities for growth in both New Zealand and Australia.

"The Shredlage process, combined with the service and support provided by the Claas Harvest Centre network, will allow contractors to provide an even better silage for livestock producers.

"In turn, this will help increase demand for better quality silage as the use of total and partial mixed rations increases in both countries.

"None of our competitors can produce this kind of chopped material," he claims.

"This technology has already been widely adopted in the USA and we have no doubt it will quickly adopted locally."

Shredlage was developed in USA by two dairy nutritionists, Roger Olsen and Ross Dale, who recognised the need to design a more efficient silage process suitable for high ratio forage diets.

The patented Shredlage Corn Cracker incorporates the existing Claas Multi-Crop Cracker which splits corn kernels, with the patented Loren Cut roller which rips long-chop (26–30 mm) corn stalk into planks and strings.

Claas says university studies and independent on-farm evaluations confirm the process delivers significant nutritional benefits compared to traditional techniques.

"One study conducted by the University of Wisconsin in Madison shows the process significantly increases dry matter intake, digestibility and milk production in dairy cows over eight weeks," Wheeler says.

"In effect, the Shredlage process improves the level of effective fibre and exposes the inner cells of the plant to microbial activity in the rumen."

"In turn, this helps to make the fibre more digestible.

"Shredlage can also help to lower feed costs by reducing the amount of straw and hay required for total and partial mixed rations to maintain optimum rumen health and function.

Other studies are planned at Cornell University in New York.

Claas will offer the technology as a factory-installed or after-market option for Jaguar forage harvesters from 2016.

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